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Educational activity will display on a transcript on the business day following the day it is completed.

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Courses

Title Duration CME Certified
1.25

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

Cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs) or strokes are the fifth leading cause of death in the United States. However, they can be treated if the patient is helped within the first four and a half hours of the event, according to the American Stroke Association. This course for healthcare providers identifies medical and lifestyle risk factors that can lead to a stroke, describes diagnostic measures used to assess stroke risk, and outlines stroke-prevention strategies and lifestyle changes. You will be equipped to educate patients on how their lifestyle can significantly impact their stroke risk and how making key changes can help them to avoid medical emergency.

Outline stroke prevention strategies and lifestyle changes.

Identify medical and lifestyle risk factors that can lead to a stroke.

Describe diagnostic measures used to assess stroke risk.

Staff Writer
Adam Roesner, BSN

 

1.00

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

Neurological dysphagia, most often caused by acute stroke, can lead to malnutrition, social restrictions, anxiety, dehydration, aspiration pneumonia, acute/chronic illnesses, or even death. This course for clinicians explains how to identify those at risk for dysphagia, and it discusses treatment strategies to improve overall outcomes for stroke patients. You will learn practical information about current swallowing screens, who should receive them, who should carry them out, and how to implement them at your facility.

Describe the incidence and outcomes of dysphagia and aspiration in those with acute strokes.

Identify the role of the Speech-Language Pathologist (SLP) in supporting, developing, and managing a dysphagia screening program for acute strokes.

Identify dysphagia screening methods and/or tools nurses can use.

Describe the role of nurses in identifying those at risk for dysphagia.

Name diagnostic procedures and treatments for those with dysphagia.

Instructor
Amy Reinstein, M.S., CCC – SLP

Staff Writer
Elizabeth Kellerman, MSN, RN

1.50

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

The early recognition of stroke symptoms and subsequent intervention have been identified as key factors in the outcomes of patients with completed strokes. This includes the initial assessment and stabilization of critical respiratory, circulatory, hemodynamic, and neurologic status, and obtaining crucial elements of a patient’s history. Distinguishing ischemic from hemorrhagic strokes requires diagnostic applications performed within narrow windows of opportunity, so that appropriate treatment options can be accurately selected and effectively administered. This course discusses the knowledge and skills needed to care for patients with an acute stroke, from onset through the first 24 hours.

Describe the physiological and symptomatic differences between ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes.

Discuss treatment interventions for acute strokes.

Describe management priorities following ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes.

Define risk factors for complications related to stroke interventions.

Staff Writer
Rebecca Smallwood, MBA, RN

1.25

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

Early identification, management, and treatment of stroke by utilizing best practice protocols can help prevent disability and death and ensure that patients have the best possible outcomes. This course presents the most up-to-date best practices for managing the patient with an acute stroke.

Describe best practice protocols for early identification of acute stroke.

Discuss current diagnostic practices in patients with acute stroke.

Identify current best practices for treatment and management of patients with acute strokes.

Expert Reviewer
Daniel Migliaccio, MD

Staff Writer
Rebecca Smallwood, MBA, RN

1.25

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

In the United States, stroke affects some 795,000 people per year and is the leading cause of long-term disability. Every patient discharge from a health-care facility comes with the potential effects of disability and need for environmental and lifestyle adaptations. Discharge planning should be an integral part of the process to help ensure safety and quality of life for the patients. This course discusses environmental barriers in the home for patients who have experienced a stroke, home safety strategies to help avoid injury and promote independence, and community resources and support groups available to assist patients and their families.

Identify environmental barriers in the home for patients following a stroke.

Describe community resources to help with disability and patient needs.

List two organizations or support groups for patients and their families who have experienced a stroke.

Describe safety strategies in the home to help avoid injury and promote independence.

Expert Reviewer
Daniel Migliaccio, MD

Instructor
Lisa Hohlbein, RN, CDP

1.50

Launch Course

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

Atrial fibrillation (AFib), the most common type of arrhythmia, affects approximately 2.2 million people in the US and is a leading risk factor for stroke. Approximately 15 percent of people who experience a stroke have AFib. While AFib is most commonly seen in patients over age 60, many who have the condition are asymptomatic, making it difficult to diagnose. Because strokes resulting from AFib can be prevented with early screening, diagnosis, and intervention, this course covers anatomical and physiological changes that contribute to increased stroke risk, along with interventions for symptom control and stroke-risk management.

Describe patient risk factors that can lead to A-Fib and subsequent stroke.

Explain anatomical and physiological changes that occur with A-Fib that contribute to increased risk for stroke.

Discuss interventions for symptom control in patients with A-Fib.

Discuss interventions to manage risk for stroke associated with A-Fib.

Instructor
Rebecca Smallwood, MBA, RN

Expert Reviewer
Daniel Migliaccio, MD

1.50

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

Cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs), or strokes, are the fifth leading cause of death in the United States. The early care that patients receive, preferably in the first four and a half hours, is critical in their prognosis and in the preservation of their functional status. Clinicians need a thorough understanding of stroke pathophysiology, along with how to assess, diagnose, and determine the appropriate plan of care. The goal of this course is to equip you to make the best possible decisions in caring for stroke patients.

Summarize and apply key neuropathophysiological concepts of different types of stroke.

Identify the types of strokes and their etiologies.

Explain the pathophysiological causes of stroke and stroke symptoms.

Recall and apply the American Heart Association and American Stroke guidelines for care of the stroke patient.

Describe treatment options for ischemic stoke and hemorrhagic stroke.

Instructor
Daniel Migliaccio, MD

Staff Writer
Adam Roesner, BSN

1.25

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

In the United States, stroke affects some 795,000 people per year and is the fifth largest cause of death. Of those patients who survive, many experience impairments requiring special care. The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) is a tool used to measure the severity of stroke symptoms and to aid in the identification of the injury location. The NIHSS has also been shown to strongly predict the likelihood of a patient’s recovery after stroke. This course will help clinicians in the acute care setting care for patients suffering from acute stroke. 

State the primary purpose of using the NIHSS.

Name all NIHSS areas of assessment.

List all stroke scale items used to test patients for stroke severity.

Calculate a summative NIHSS score and identify levels of stroke severity.

Instructor
Rebecca Smallwood, MBA, RN

Expert Reviewer
Daniel Migliaccio, MD

1.25

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

The American Stroke Association estimates that 85 percent of all strokes are related to ischemia, and in the United States, ischemic strokes are the leading cause of adult disability. Since early intervention is key, this course discusses pharmacological agents (thrombolytics) that destroy clots and are often used as part of the treatment plan.

Outline patient monitoring techniques and management principles.

Describe the physiological stages of clot creation.

Differentiate between clot inhibition and fibrinolysis.

Staff Writer
Adam Roesner, BSN

Expert Reviewer
Lisa Hohlbein, RN, CDP

1.75

Launch Course

AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™

Origination: Reviewed: Expiration:

The American Stroke Association estimates that 85 percent of all strokes are related to ischemia, and in the United States, ischemic strokes are the leading cause of adult disability. In stroke care, prevention is key. This course discusses patient-monitoring techniques and management principles, along with the use of pharmacological agents that slow or prevent clot development.

Describe the physiological states of coagulation.

Discuss the pharmacological agents of anticoagulation used in venous thromboembolism prophylaxis therapy.

Outline patient monitoring techniques and management principles.

Instructor
Kristen Ponichtera BSN, RN, CFRN, CTRN, CCRN

Expert Reviewer
Daniel Migliaccio, MD

1.00

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

Proficiency in the use of a validated stroke scale, such as the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), is important for any member of the healthcare team caring for patients with acute stroke. This stroke assessment scale efficiently assesses stroke severity, offering objective information about prognosis and outcomes along with directing early treatment. With proper training in the use of the NIHSS, including serial monitoring, specifically for those at risk for worsening neurologic status, little variance should exist in results among clinicians. Education is essential to improving reliability and increasing effective communication regarding treatment of stroke patient

State how to perform a neurological assessment using the NIHSS

Describe the stroke scale’s validity in predicting lesion size and stroke severity

Discuss the NIHSS as a predictor of outcomes in patients with stroke 

Instructor
Anna Ver Hage, MSN, AGACNP-BC, CCRN, CNRN

Expert Reviewer
Susan Tocco, RN, MSN, CNS, CNRN, CCNS
Terri-Ellen J Kiernan, RN, FNP

1.00

Launch Course

Origination: Expiration:

Stroke, the fifth-ranking cause of death and a leading cause of disability in the U.S., is the country‘s primary neurological problem. Each year, about 800,000 people have a new or recurrent stroke costing more than $34 billion in medical care and disability. Risk factors, characteristics of left- and right-hemispheric strokes and appropriate rehabilitation goals are discussed.

List modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors of stroke

Identify neurological deficits associated with left- and right-hemispheric strokes

List appropriate goals of rehabilitation for a patient who has had a stroke 

Instructor
Lisa Bowman, MSN, RN, CRNP, CNRN

1.00

Launch Course

ANCC Accreditation

Origination: Expiration:

Experiencing a stroke can result in a permanently devastating condition. While some risk factors are uncontrollable, certain practices can help prevent, limit, and even reverse stroke damage. This course equips providers of senior healthcare to facilitate stroke recovery by knowing the signs and symptoms of stroke, being able to perform quick assessments, and responding appropriately. Also included: strategies for stroke prevention and ways to help your patients achieve quality of life after a stroke.

Discuss the pathophysiology of a stroke, including scope, risk factors, effects, treatment, and prevention.

Describe the connection between stroke and heart disease.

Perform and interpret stroke assessments and intervene according to professional standards of practice.

Identify strategies for achieving quality of life after a stroke.

Instructor
Ann Elsasser-Root, PT DPT

Staff Writer
Ron Orth RN, CHC, CMAC, AHIMA-Approved ICD-10-CM Trainer